Saint Philip's Catholic Church

Hirschville, ND

NE Quarter of the NW Quarter of Township 141 N Range 94 W Section 2

Download this historical account of St. Philip's Church as a PDF document
Download the St. Philip's Church 75th Anniversary Jubilee booklet
View the St. Philip's Church photo album
View the cemetery as it is today   GPS coord: 47.066402,-102.557749‎
       see this old map for location of church and Hirschville
Interesting interview about the church

 The hope of owning land, free land in a free country, was the magnet which attracted thousands of immigrants to the Great Northwest.  Homesteading northwest of Taylor, ND as early as 1893 were German speaking immigrants from Russia whose forefathers had immigrated to Russia from Germany and Poland in the early 1800’s.  These homesteaders were predominantly devout Catholics who prayed with their families in their own homes.

 Father Vincent Wehrle, a Swiss missionary priest named Abbot in 1904 of the newly formed Benedictine Abbey at Richardton, and Father Ildephonse Pesche, an Alsace born missionary priest, did missionary work among these sparsely settled German-Russian immigrants.  Regular pastoral care began in 1905-1906.  Masses were celebrated and sacraments were administered in the homes of Philip Gribnau and Vitalius Frederick.

 Many German speaking immigrants arrived from Hungary in 1907-1908.  After this influx of people, Abbot Wehrle considered the feasibility of a country church.  After much deliberation he selected a site most centrally located.  On December 12, 1910, Casper and Marianna Hirsch donated six acres of land for the proposed churchyard.   Philip Gribnau, Casper Hirsch and Vitalius Frederick, serving as the first trustees, secured pledges from 35 families of the Taylor Lumber Company for building supplies.

 Philip Gribnau, a carpenter by trade, designed and supervised the church’s construction.  Costs were approximately $800.  Manifesting their personal faith in God, the trustees along with a group of other dedicated pioneers made their dream become a reality.  The furnishings of the pioneer church were generously donated by the people. 

 Father Ildephonse Pesche celebrated the first Mass in the prairie church June 29, 1909.  Abbot Wehrle was consecrated Bishop of the Diocese of Bismark on May 19, 1910.  Within a few months, on October 7, 1910, he made his first visit to St. Philip’s Parish to administer the sacrament of Confirmation.

 Many new settlers were coming to the little church and by 1916, it is said, 125-130 families belonged to the Parish.  The little church had been inadequate for some time.  A larger church was built in 1916 by the Bayer Lumber Company of Gladstone and cost about $7,000.  Bishop Wehrle blessed it the same year.  Philip Gribnau owned a team of white horses which were used to bring the Bishop out to the church on important occasions. 

St. Phillip's Church

Many new furnishings became necessary and most of the new items were purchased with money collected for this purpose.  Some families made special contributions and had their names printed on their particular purchase.  “Donated by Joseph and Magdalena Kress” is printed on the base of the St. Joseph’s altar.  Adam and Henry Schmidt donated the Blessed Virgin altar.  The Kress and Kerner families donated the large picture of the Annunication and the angels on the main altar were gifts of the John and Valentine Sickler families.

The resurrection altar has the names of its donors inscribed.  They are:  Mathias Keller, Michael Keller, Anthony Menzel, Anthony Leiss and Valentine Sickler.  The angel holy water fountains have the names of Philip Gribnau and Vitalius Frederick printed on their bases. 

Women of the parish spent several winters making exquisite linens for the new altars.  The hand-drawn knit like lace linen covering the main and resurrection alters were made by Mrs. Anone Menzel, Sr. and Mrs. Joe Freer crocheted the scalloped linen covering the side altars.  The artistic filet crochet featuring crosses and chalices which hung at the communion rail were made by the Heinert, Kary, and Schloss women.  Mrs. Emanuel Wanner also did crochet work.  Mrs. Ferdinand Sampson made most of the finger towels and chalice cloths used at Mass.  Mrs. John Sickler, Sr., Mrs. Antone Menzel, Mrs. Christ Miller, and Mrs. Ferdinand Sampson washed and ironed church linens for many years.

 The people of St. Philip’s, happy and proud of their new church, contributed endless number of days cleaning, painting, repairing and constructing.  Many are remembered for their contributions.  Many more are unhonored and unsung and known only to God! 

 On October 23, 1916, Mr. and Mrs. John Kress had the honor of being the first couple to be married in the new church.

 Father Ildephonse Pesche served as pastor until 1912.  Father Basil Thum, also a Swiss missionary priest, served St. Philip’s from 1912 to 1914.  Serving the parish from 1914 to 1917 was another Swiss missionary, Father Benedict Peter.  During the years 1917-1922, Father Felix Hummer, a German priest and resident pastor at Gladstone, served both parishes.  He drove back and forth as necessary in his Model T Ford, a gift from the St. Philip’s parishioners.  Father Vincent Wiget, also a Swiss missionary priest, commuted from the Abbey.  He served St. Philip’s from 1922-1924.  After 1924 Father Paul Lotter, also German speaking and the resident pastor at Gladstone, administered to the spiritual needs of both parishes.  During his pastorate the church basement was excavated and the walls were constructed with the tile-like blocks salvaged from the Rathschiller Hall.  Having a basement under the church made it possible to install a larger hot air furnace.  The men of the parish did all of the basement work.  They came with their horses and scrapers, their shovels, picks and whatever was necessary.  Father Lotter, who had done missionary work among the Indians, was accustomed to hard work.  He was a humble man, loved and respected by his people.

St. Philip's Church rectory

In 1928 Father Lotter designed and supervised the construction of the rectory which was built by Carl Bingart of Hebron at a cost of $4,570. 

Father Suitbert Brueckmann, the first resident pastor, arrived in October 1928.  Since the new rectory was not quite complete, Mr. and Mrs. Sebastian Gieser graciously invited Father to live with them.  He said his daily masses in their home.  They took him to church with their horses and sled during heavy snow.  Raymond Gieser recalls that Father was a good checker player.  “He won most of the time” Raymond admits.  Father Bruekmann move into the new rectory on May 1, 1929.  It was a beautiful two story house, considered the finest in the whole parish.  The new pastor installed running water, a bathroom and a 32 volt lighting plant.  Each family was assessed $60 to help pay for the new rectory and the necessary furnishings.  The financial statement of 1929 lists 86 families. 

 

St. Philip's Church rock gardenDuring Father Brueckmann’s pastorate, beautiful rock gardens enclosed with rock fences were built.  Statement rock arches over steel gates gave entrance to the secluded garden area – which became a virtual oasis on the open prairies.  Four European style grottos were built.  They served as chapels during parish processions.

 

processionLed by the priest carrying the Blessed Sacrament, altar boys carried the crucifix and candles and were followed by the choir singing the Latin Litany of the Saints.  The entire parish answered the pleas to individual saints with “Ora Pro Nobis.”  (Pray for us.)  These pageant-like processions were held on Holy Saturday, the three days of prayer prior to Ascension Day and the feast of Corpus Christi.  The most elaborate procession was held the first Sunday of May, celebrating the feast of St. Philip, the parish patron.  On this memorable day young girls dressed in white, carrying baskets of flowers (a mixture of wild flowers and crepe paper), preceded the priest in the procession and scattered flowers on his path.  Every mother in the parish deemed it a great privilege to have her daughter included in the festive ceremonies.

 

Father Paul Lotter of Gladstone was very helpful with the various installations in the rectory and the scoria work in the yard.  He planted many of the trees still in existence. 

sanctuary statue

Two new statues were added to the sanctuary.  These were the Sacred Heart statue donated by the John Sickler, Sr. family and the Sorrowful Blessed Mother donated by the Joseph Bernhardt family.  Mrs. Mike Sickler and the Bernhardt girls crocheted linens for the bases on which the statues stood.

 Father Suitbert, a stately, aristocratic German priest, had presence and a colorful personality.  Isabella Reidinger, his housekeeper, also was a fashionable, aristocratic lady.  She played the organ and directed the choir.  She was an accomplished musician.

Despite the depression, Father Brueckmann and his housekeeper added a whole new environment to the pioneer parish.  The cost of the rectory and its furnishing, combined with the costs of a resident pastor, became a financial burden to the impoverished farmers of the “Dirty 30s.”  The depression, with its seemingly endless years of drought, made farming impossible for many.  Many farmers left St. Philip’s during these years.  It was impossible to make a living on the homestead acreage and many looked elsewhere to make a living.  Those that wished to stay annexed abandoned farms.

 

In 1940, Father Joseph Wacker and his housekeeper, Betty Schmidt, came to St. Philip’s and lived in the parish rectory.  They enjoyed living in the country and made friends with the parish people.  Father Wacker understood these German people in his new parish. He was born in Germany, educated in the United States – but he was an American.  Father Wacker saw the needs of the young people who were memorizing German prayers and the German Catechism in 1940.  He knew the adults needed to change many old customs.  Smoothly and rather speedily he moved his parish into the twenty-first century.  With his guidance the parish quite suddenly abandoned their mother tongue in church at least, and spoke English.

 Father Wacker freed the parish of its debts.  He modernized and completely renovated the interior of the church.  The farmers who survived the depression made great progress during the 1940’s.  Abundant moisture and war time high prices for farm produce once again made farming profitable.  Father Wacker’s successor, Father Arnold Backes, the last pastor to live in the parish house, served the parish only a short time and retired because of poor health.

 Many repairs and replacements were made during the pastorate of Father Arthur Soukup, an Assumption Abbey priest who came to St. Philip’s in 1951.  The old coal furnace was replaced with a new propane fueled hot air heating plant during the fall of 1958.  The old reed organ was replaced in 1960 with a new Baldwin electric organ.  The main altar and the two side altars which were in need of much repair were replaced in 1964.  The replacement altars were purchased from St. Michael’s Church south of Richardton when that church was closed.  The church basement was completely remodeled and a new ceiling was installed during the winter of 1967-1968.

The sanctuary was revised in accordance with Vatican 11.  The universal use of Latin at Mass was discontinued and the Mass was celebrated in the language of the people.  Father Arthur introduced the use of the missalette, and the entire congregation prayed the prayers of the Mass with the priest, all in the English language.  Prior to this time the people silently followed the Latin Mass in their own missals.

 The loyal parish spirit, characteristic of the St. Philip’s people, gives living testimony to Father Arthur’s exemplary moral and spiritual leadership.  He served his people well for nearly twenty years.  The financial statement of 1970 lists 37 families belonging to St. Philip’s Parish.

 The once beautiful rectory was vacated in 1951.  During the 1950’s and 1960’s it was only used during a two week period each summer in the month of June when religion vacation school was held for the children of grade school age.  In the 1970’s and 1980’s grade school children are given religious instruction during release time at Gladstone where they went to grade school. 

 It was very impractical to keep maintaining the parish house.  During the pastorate of Father Feeney the parish decided it must be sold.  The furnishings were sold at private parish auction on a warm Sunday afternoon in June 1972.  Albert Sickler served as the auctioneer.  The proceeds of the sales amounted to $1,938.75.  This amount was added to the parish’s general fund.  The house was sold shortly after to Francis Hecker of Gladstone for $1,000.

 The rural areas of North Dakota have been depopulating for decades and in 1997 St. Philip's was closed. The Church was sold and torn down.  The cemetery is being maintained.  The parish records of baptisms, marriages and deaths are kept at St. Mary's Church, Richardton, ND.

 
In its day St. Philip's was an active vibrant parish. The faith of the mostly German-Hungarians and some German-Russians that settled the area is evident in the vocations that came for this parish -- one priest, two brothers and 7 sisters:

 

Sister Glora Degele                   Professed vows July 17, 1965

            Brother Fridolin Sickler              Professed vows January 30, 1958

            Sister Genevieve Heinert            Professed vows June 29, 1955

            Sister Louise Messmer              Professed vows May 6, 1950

            Father Thomas Knopik               Ordained June 3, 1948

            Sister Lornette Sickler                Professed vows July 11, 1945

            Brother Philip Kress                   Professed vows July 11, 1943

Sister Arletta Sickler                  Professed vows June 1939

            Sister Georgella Sickler             Professed vows July 11, 1933

            Sister Marietta Sickler                Professed vows July 11, 1933

 

 

St. Philips Catholic Cemetery

 

St. Philips’ Catholic Cemetery

 
There are two reference lists of people interred at St. Phillips’ Catholic Cemetery.   

The first list was transcribed from a copy of the original church records and crossed referenced with a copy of the Interments Book.  The church records document deaths recorded from April 1909 to November 23, 1982.  The records were hand written in Latin from April 1909 to June 3, 1971.  The Interments Book was hand written and recorded deaths from June 11, 1932 to May 13, 1984 with no deaths recorded at all between 1941 and 1971.  Both original sources were photo copied poorly and difficult to read.

Babies appear to have been laid to rest in Block A of the cemetery.  If "hours", "days" or "mos" is not note, the number represents the age in "years".

The second list was created from tombstone inscriptions on April 28, 2003.  At that time the cemetery had not been maintained.  There were many sites marked with the same kind of simply constructed metal cross.  Most of these crosses had rusted away their original inscriptions, which appeared to have been painted on initially, not welded or engraved.  There were many areas either sunken or marked with irises or lilacs that could be the sites of unmarked graves.

Both lists are incomplete.

 

Source:  Original Church Records and the Interments Book

Last Name

First Name

Birth

Death

Block

Lot

Grave

Age

Comments

?aphizatus

Emmanual Wanne (or Wayne)

2/1921

 

 

 

 

 

 

?aphizatus

Franzisek Leibnan?

 

1/1921

 

 

 

 

 

Abfalter

Anna

 

1/2/1928

 

 

 

11

 

Abfalter

Carolus

4/15/1909

10/28/1928

 

 

 

19

 

Bechler

Katharina

 

3/27/1920

 

 

 

 

 

Bechler

Paulus Michael

 

3/21/1912

 

 

 

2 mos
26 days

 

Berger

Catharina

 

10/29/1913

 

 

 

1 yr
7 mos
19 days

 

Berger

Franziseus Martinus

 

12/29/1928

 

 

 

 

 

Berger

Helena

 

1/27/1919

 

 

 

 

 

Berger

Marianna

 

1/30/1921

 

 

 

 

 

Berger

Rosa Maria

4/7/1935

5/6/1935

A

 

 

0

 

Bernhardt

Child of Elenora

 

8/25/1924

 

 

 

 

 

Betschner

Johan

 

10/15/1924

 

 

 

 

 

Betschner

N. N.

 

1/5/1923

 

 

 

 

 

Boespflug

Margaretta (or Margaretha)

4/20/1865

6/11/1932

B

5

1

67

 

Boespflug

Roehus

 

12/19/1928

 

 

 

38

 

Dauenhauer

Emma

 

1/14/1919

 

 

 

 

 

Dauenhauer

Emmanuel

10/1/1874

6/14/1934

B

5

10

60

 

Dauenhauer

Florentina

 

4/3/1912

 

 

 

9 hours

 

Dauenhauer

Parvulus

 

6/6/1911

 

 

 

1 day

 

Degele

Appolonia

 

9/14/1966

 

 

 

 

 

Deibele

Jackie (Jacobus)

8/19/1929

7/7/1934

A

 

 

5

 

Deibele

Puer

 

3/26/1931

 

 

 

 

 

Deibele

Rosa

10/6/1906

4/7/1931

 

 

 

25

 

Fichter

Agnes Mary

9/17/1931

9/12/1936

A

 

 

5

 

Fichter

Christ

 

5/13/1984

 

 

 

 

 

Last Name

First Name

Birth

Death

Block

Lot

Grave

Age

Comments

Fichter

Frank

 

7/1982

 

 

 

60

 

Fichter

Frank J.

4/7/1922

7/20/1982

 

 

 

60

 

Fichter

Franziocus

 

11/1/1929

 

 

 

58

 

Fichter

Margareta

3/18/1879

11/1/1940

 

 

 

61

 

Fichter

Marianna Catherina

1/9/1937

1/19/1937

A

 

 

0

 

Fichter

Monica

12/5/1913

6/1971

 

 

 

58

 

Fichter

Monica

12/5/1913

5/31/1971

 

 

 

58

 

Fichter

Theresia Marianna

 

12/22/1913

 

 

 

4 mos
21 days

 

Frederick

Barbara M.

6/18/1936

8/31/1936

A

 

 

0

 

Freer

?ue? (Puer maybe)

 

1/15/1931

 

 

 

 

Parents were Franzisci Freer and Florentinae Sartuer

Freer

Lauretta

 

9/30/1927

 

 

 

 

 

Freer

Martin

 

12/22/1912

 

 

 

63

 

Freer

Peter

 

12/31/1917

 

 

 

3 mos

 

Freer

Theodor

8/13/1936

2/22/1939

A

 

 

3

 

Froeloch

Regina Jakolina

 

7/20/1916

 

 

 

32 days

 

Garecht

Rosa

 

1/11/1917

 

 

 

33

 

Garresht

Peter Paul

 

8/25/1925

 

 

 

13

 

Geiger

Puer

 

1/24/1931

 

 

 

 

 

Gieser

Elizabeth

 

12/1940

C

 

 

80

 

Gieser

Monica

 

1/10/1916

 

 

 

10 day

 

Gress

Petrus

 

11/2/1917

 

 

 

1 mos

 

Gress (or Kress)

Josephus

1855

8/20/1935

B

5

 

80

 

Haag

Leo

4/14/1927

11/6/1929

 

 

 

2

 

Heidecker

Mathias

6/16/1918

1/18/1937

B

1

8

19

 

Heinert

Bonita Marie

 

5/6/1957

 

 

 

 

 

Heinert

Elisabeth

12/26/1930

5/17/1931

 

 

 

1

 

Heinert

Elisabeth Rosa

 

12/28/1928

 

 

 

 

 

Heinert

Genevieve

1/21/1903

11/23/1982

 

 

 

79

 

Heinert

Richard Mathias

2/28/1936

7/7/1936

A

 

 

0

 

Heinert

Theresia

 

6/26/1928

 

 

 

55

 

Hem

Geneveve

1/21/1903

11/23/1982

 

 

 

79

 


 


Last Name

First Name

Birth

Death

Block

Lot

Grave

Age

Comments

Hitchrich

Martin

 

12/27/1920

 

 

 

 

Per Mary Stradiotto 10/13/2003, Hitchrick Family Historian, the correct spelling is Hitchrick. According to information provided by the DCHS 12/16/2004 from Lou and Mary Stradiotto: b. 04/16/1909

Hranint?

Karl

 

11/1921

 

 

 

 

 

Jahner

Rosa

 

11/25/1936

B

1

2

44

 

Kary

Anna Maria

4/30/1925

11/25/1930

 

 

 

5

 

Keller

Barbara

 

10/31/1918

 

 

 

 

 

Keller

Bertha Josephine

 

10/1941

 

 

 

0

 

Keller

George

 

5/4/1928

 

 

 

 

 

Keller

Jennovia Theobald

 

3/4/1918

 

 

 

 

 

Keller

Johannes

10/8/1864

11/9/1929

 

 

 

65

 

Keller

Johannes J.

 

2/1921

 

 

 

 

 

Keller

Puella

 

7/11/1954

 

 

 

 

 

Keller

Puer

 

10/15/1931

 

 

 

 

 

Keller

Sebastianus

 

9/27/1909

 

 

 

9 mos

 

Knopick

Sebastianus

 

1/22/1929

 

 

 

 

Per Frances (Knopik) Meduna 12/16/2004, the correct first name is Sebastian

Kress

Magdalena

 

6/16/1922

 

 

 

 

 

Leiss

Anna

 

9/24/1911

 

 

 

15 mos
14 days

 

Leiss

Maria Louisa

 

6/3/1929

 

 

 

49

 

Leiss

Sebastian

3/31/1877

4/29/1939

B

 

 

62

 

Magelky

Josephus Herbertus

 

2/9/1911

 

 

 

3 1/2 mos

 

Magelky

Mathias

 

10/30/1926

 

 

 

73

 

Meale

 

 

11/12/1916

 

 

 

 

 

Menzel

Antonius

 

2/8/1961

 

 

 

 

According to Helen Heiser on 2/14/2002, granddaughter of Antone Menzel, the actual death date is 6/7/1950. Church records written in chronological order clearly indicate 2/8/1961 as his death date. The interment book has no deaths recorded for 1950.

Last Name

First Name

Birth

Death

Block

Lot

Grave

Age

Comments

Menzel

Rosalia

 

1/30/1959

 

 

 

 

Someone hand wrote June 6, 1960 above this record.

Merly

Mrs.

 

11/20/1926

 

 

 

abt 52

 

Messmer

George P.

 

6/19/1953

 

 

 

 

 

Messmer

Rosalia Keller

10/1900

5/9/1936

B

1

10

36

 

Meyer

Bernard

6/22/1867

9/1/1935

B

5

8

68

 

Meyer

Daniel Belhassar

12/13/1934

9/9/1935

A

 

 

0

 

Meyer

Mary

 

4/1941

 

 

 

0

 

Miller

Anna

 

7/12/1924

 

 

 

59

 

Miller

John A.

 

10/14/1963

 

 

 

 

 

Miller

Martin

 

9/18/1913

 

 

 

4 mos
16 days

 

Mueller

Jac John (Jacobus Joannes)

7/3/1934

8/22/1934

A

 

 

0

 

Oster

Catharina

1858

10/12/1935

B

1

1

77

 

Oster

Peter

 

4/27/1926

 

 

 

 

 

Oster

Valentine (Valenhiues)

12/22/1852

8/27/1937

B

1

1

85

 

Pelzer

Turius or Senisui or Gemini ?

11/3/1932

A

 

 

 

 

He was an unmarried male. Mother's name was Rosa Keller.

Pfeifer

Maria M?

3/22/1921

7/28/1931

 

 

 

10

 

Plotzky

Franciseus

 

8/18/1914

 

 

 

2

 

Reichert

Catharina

3/18/1875

4/19/1938

B

1

6

63

 

Reis

Virginia Emma Rosa

 

6/29/1931

 

 

 

 

 

Rienert

Anton

 

5/24/1917

 

 

 

10 mos

 

Runk

Soames (or Loames)

 

7/6/1913

 

 

 

29

 

Saetzfied ?

Clement Anthony

11/22/1934

7/6/1937

A

 

 

3

 

Sand

Wendel D.

 

12/13/1954

 

 

 

 

 

Last Name

First Name

Birth

Death

Block

Lot

Grave

Age

Comments

Sand

Wendel Frank

 

1/10/1964

 

 

 

 

 

Sattler

Emilia

 

4/1909

 

 

 

1 mos

 

Schaff

Adam

 

1/18/1913

 

 

 

1 day

 

Schaff

Florentina

 

3/3/1912

 

 

 

1 mos
6 days

 

Schaff

Otto

 

1/6/1911

 

 

 

2 mos

 

Schaff

Violet Eugenia

 

12/23/1913

 

 

 

 

 

Schiltz

Leonard

 

9/21/1962

 

 

 

 

 

Last Name

First Name

Birth

Death

Block

Lot

Grave

Age

Comments

Schmalz

Adam

 

1/22/1910

 

 

 

1 day

 

Schorsch

Mathias

 

5/27/1915

 

 

 

 

 

Schuler

Puella

 

3/31/1929

 

 

 

 

 

Seiser

John (Joannes)

10/3/1932

8/18/1934

A

 

 

2

 

Sickler

Franziskus

 

4/13/1918

 

 

 

 

 

Sickler

Joseph

 

7/25/1959

 

 

 

 

 

Sickler

Joseph William

 

12/6/1962

 

 

 

 

 

Sickler

Larry A.

 

5/31/1963

 

 

 

 

 

Sickler

Michael Casper

7/9/1929

5/22/1939

C

2

6

10

 

Stolz

parvulus

 

12/1910

 

 

 

 

 

Thellmaun

Peter

9/29/1919

12/8/1934

B

5

4

15

 

Toth (or Joth)

Ludavicus

 

5/26/1919

 

 

 

 

 

Trost

Girl Child

 

6/10/1925

 

 

 

 

 

Unknown

 

 

5/12/1919

 

 

 

 

Church Records last entry on page 3 illegible

Walter

Helena

4/8/1940

4/12/1940

A

 

 

0

 

Walter

Perpetua Marie

10/4/1935

10/6/1935

A

 

 

0

 

Wanner

Emmaunuel

5/21/1876

12/8/1938

B

1

4

62

 

Wanner

John K.

10/1901

9/2/1935

B

5

6

34

 

Wanner

Martinus

6/10/1910

6/3/1935

B

5

9

25

 

Menzel

Antonius

 

2/8/1961

 

 

 

 

 

Menzel

Rosalia

 

1/30/1959

 

 

 

 

Someone hand wrote June 6, 1960 above this record.

Zillich

Joannes

4/18/1881

1/19/1933

B

5

 

51

Possible birth date may be 4/18/1887

Zillich

Johannes

 

12/26/1925

 

 

 

1 mos
1 day

 

Zillich

John

 

11/27/1926

 

 

 

3 mos

 

Zillich

Senisui ? (or Gemini?)

4/9/1933

4/9/1933

B

 

2

0

 

List obtained March 2002 - Original Interment Copies by D. Gaylem
Transcribed by T. A. Godlevsky

 


 


Source:  Tombstone Inscriptions by T. A. Godlevsky, April 28, 2003

Last Name

First Name

Birth

Death

Comments

Abfalder

Anna

1917

1927

This marker contained a very clear, very well preserved photo of a girl.

Abfalder

Karl

1909

1928

This marker contained a very clear, very well preserved photo of a young man.

Berger

Hellena

12/29/1881

6/27/1919

 

Bernhardt

Justina E.

1924

1924

 

Boespflug

Margaret

1861

1932

 

Boespflug

Rochus (or Rockus)

9/28/1880

12/19/1928

This marker contained a very clear, very well preserved photo of a man.

Dauenhauer

Emanuel

10/18/1874

6/14/1934

 

Dauenhauer

Florendina

4/3/1912

4/3/1912

 

Diebel

Rose

1906

1931

 

Dillinger

Christ J.

1/17/1929

11/17/1943

This marker contained a very clear, very well preserved photo of a man.

Fichter

Agnes Margaret

9/17/1931

9/12/1936

 

Fichter

Anna

7/5/1920

11/19/1921

 

Fichter

Christ

1901

1984

 

Fichter

Frank J.

1922

1982

 

Fichter

Franz "Frank"

6/23/1916

11/20/1921

 

Fichter

Joseph

7/10/1918

11/21/1921

 

Fichter

Margaret

1912

 

 

Fichter

Mary Catharine

1/8/1937

1/18/1937

 

Fichter

Monica

1913

1971

Mother

Fichter

Nick

1911

1996

Father

Fichter

Thresia Marianna

8/2/1913

12/21/1913

 

Fichter

Willie

11/14/1935

11/14/1935

 

Fichter*

Frank

1/27/1871

11/1/1929

Father

Fichter*

Margaret

12/18/1879

11/1/1940

Mother

Freer

Franklin Peter

1/15/1931

1/15/1931

 

Freer

Loretta M.

9/5/1927

9/30/1927

 

Freer

Martin

1/7/1854

12/19/1912

 

Freer

Sebastian

 

 

This site is marked with a simply constructed metal cross which had rusted away much of the inscription.

Freer

Theodore

1936

1936

 

Gieser

Adam

1919

1919

 

Gieser

Elisabeth

1860

1940

Mother

Gieser

Frank

1910

1924

 

Last Name

First Name

Birth

Death

Comments

Gieser

Frank

2/5/1910

8/23/1924

 

Gieser

Monica

1915

1916

 

Goetzfridt

Clement A.

11/22/1934

2/2/1937

 

Heinert

Bonita M.

1955

1957

 

Heinert

Carl

1898

1986

 

Heinert

Elsie B.

1930

1931

 

Heinert

Elsie Rosa

11/27/1928

12/28/1928

 

Heinert

Frank

 

 

Familie

Heinert

Genevieve

1903

1982

 

Heinert

Richard

2/28/1936

7/10/1936

Our Baby

Hellman

Peter

1919

1934

 

Hronish

Charles

3/17/1880

9/30/1922

 

Jahner

Rosa

1893

1936

 

Kary

Anna Maria

4/30/1925

11/25/1930

 

Keller

Catherine

 

 

This site is marked with a simply constructed metal cross which was broken and had rusted away much of the inscription. It is possible the first name may not be Catherine.

Keller

Louisa

1863

1950

Mother

Keller

Martin

9/29/1877

3/22/1923

Father

Keller

Martin

1866

1947

Father

Kress

John

1855

1935

 

Kress

Magdalena

1859

1922

 

Kress

Peter

10/5/1917

11/2/1917

 

Leiss

Anna

 

 

 

Leiss

Maria

5/31/1880

6/3/1929

 

Menzel

Anton Sr.

1870

1950

"Father" on family marker.

Menzel

Rosalia

1869

1959

"Mother" on family marker.

Merly

G. (or C.)

 

1926

Mother

Messmer

George P.

1900

1953

Father

Messmer

Rosalia

1899

1936

Mother

Meyer

Barnhart

6/22/1867

9/11/1935

This marker appears to be a handmade metal cross. Both capital letter D’s in the word DIED are reversed.

Meyer

Donald B.

12/23/1934

9/9/1935

 

Meyer

Edward G.

1928

1987

 

Pfeiffer

Frank

1873

1945

 

Sand

Wendel

1894

1964

 

Sand

Wendel Dominick

11/26/1930

12/13/1954

North Dakota PFC US Marine Corps Res Korea PH

Schiltz

Leonard

1885

1962

Father

Last Name

First Name

Birth

Death

Comments

Schiltz

Theresa C.

1883

1946

Mother

Sickler

Frank

1917

1917

 

Sickler

Joseph

1959

1959

 

Sickler

Joseph W.

1962

1962

 

Sickler

Larry A.

1945

1963

Son

Stoltz

Wilhelm

10/7/1910

11/22/1910

 

Toth

Alois

6/26/1871

5/26/1918

 

Walter

Helena

1940

1940

 

Walter

Joseph

1939

1939

 

Walter

Perpetua

1935

1935

 

Walter

 

 

 

Possible family marker. This is a tall, skinny, stone marker usually seen used for individuals. There appeared to be no other inscription, not even one that could have possibly been worn off by exposure.

12/16/2004 According to Magdalene (Walter) Knopik, daughter of Stephen Walter, Stephen Walter and two of his daughters were buried on either side of his grave site or on top of it. Their names were Rosemarie and Rosie.

Wanner

Anthony

 

 

 

Wanner

Anton

 

 

 

Wanner

Antonia

 

 

 

Wanner

Elizabeth

1880

1948

Mother

Wanner

Emanuel

5/21/1877

12/8/1938

Father

Wanner

John K.

10/15/1901

9/2/1935

Father

Wanner

Martin

1910

1935

 

Zillich

John

1881

1933

Beloved Father

In addition to the marked gravesites, 35 sites were marked are follows but those laid to rest are unknown:

1 site

This site is marked with a wood cross which had no inscription. This area of ground is clearly sunken.

1 site

This site is marked with a simply constructed, broken metal cross which had rusted away any markings of a possible inscription. This marker is close enough to the Walter’s babies – Perptua, Joseph, & Helena, that it could possibly be another marker for them.

1 site

This site is marked with a simply constructed metal cross which had rusted away much of the inscription. What is left appears to be JOH? ?R?NT.

1 site

This site is marked with a stone marker in which the inscription had weathered away.

1 site

This site is outlined with cement. No marker, no inscription.

1 site

This site is marked with two broken wood crosses with no inscriptions.

1 site

This site is marked with a simply constructed metal cross which had rusted away any markings of a possible inscription and had broken. Just east of this marker is another simply constructed metal cross with no inscription. This one is outlined in wood and appears to be the size for that of a baby. Because of the proximatey of this marker to the other, it is unclear if this marker indicates a separate grave or not.

1 site

This site is marked with a simply constructed metal cross which had rusted away any markings of a possible inscription and had broken. The last name may be FRER.

1 site

This site is marked with a broken wood cross and a simply constructed metal cross which had also broken. Neither marker had an inscription.

1 site

This site is outlined with cement and filled with irises. No marker, no inscription.

1 site

This site is outlined with cement and filled with lilac bushes. No marker, no inscription.

1 site

This site is marked with a cement table, however the inscription was missing.

2 sites

This site is marked with a simply constructed metal cross which had rusted away any markings of a possible inscription. This area of ground is clearly sunken.

3 sites

This site is marked with a broken wood cross which had no inscription. This area of ground is clearly sunken.

3 sites

This site is marked with a wood cross with no inscription.

3 sites

This site is marked with a broken wood cross with no inscription.

4 sites

This site is marked with a simply constructed metal cross which had rusted away any markings of a possible inscription and had broken.

8 sites

This site is marked with a simply constructed metal cross which had rusted away any markings of a possible inscription.

 

 

Sources:

St. Philip’s Catholic Chuch, 75th Jubilee, June 24, 1984

St. Mary’s Church, Richardton, ND

Dunn County, North Dakota – Genealogy & History (http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nddunn2/cems/stphillipscatholic.html )