Philomena Kubischta  ‎(I01510)‎
Name:
Philomena Kubischta
Married Name: Philomena Klein

Show Details Source: OneWorldTree
Publication: Name: The Generations Network, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA;
Citation Details: Database online.
  Text: Record for Frank Klein

   


Gender: FemaleFemale
      

Birth: 6 January 1900 Dickinson, Stark, North Dakota, USA
Death: 28 December 1938 ‎(Age 38)‎ Dickinson, Stark, North Dakota, USA

Personal Facts and Details
Birth 6 January 1900 Dickinson, Stark, North Dakota, USA


Show Details Source: OneWorldTree
Publication: Name: The Generations Network, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA;
Citation Details: Database online.
  Text: Record for Frank Klein

Marriage 3 March 1922 ‎(Age 22)‎ Paul Klein - Dickinson, Stark, North Dakota, USA

Death 28 December 1938 ‎(Age 38)‎ Dickinson, Stark, North Dakota, USA


Show Details Source: OneWorldTree
Publication: Name: The Generations Network, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA;
Citation Details: Database online.
  Text: Record for Frank Klein

View Details for ...


Immediate Family  (F00853)
Paul Klein
1897 - 1961
Private
-
Frank J. Klein
1928 - 2005
Private
-
Private
-
Private
-
Valentine G. Klein
1932 - 1989
Anton Klein
1926 - 1997


Notes

Note
Philomena Kubischta was a twin to Louie E. Kubischta, born on January 6, 1900 to a pioneer farmer and rancher family of . Their father was born in and grew up on the , one of the most beautiful spots in the land of the Czars. Because of its wonderful climactic conditions, was well known in the remotest antiquity, and was also a most desirable outpost for the Scythians and the Greeks before the Christian era and then the Romans and Byzantines. In the 13th century the country was conquered by Mongols under Genghis Khan, and held by them until 1475 when it was taken by the Turks.

When the rulers of Russia repeatedly invited the Germans, in 1763, to settle the regions of the mighty Volga, in 1804, the rolling steppes of the Ukraine, as well as later on, in 1862, the Bohemians and Moravians to settle the northern part of Crimea, they promised them not only a certain amount of free land, but a number of special privileges, which they treasured highly. The Czars were more liberal with their immigrants than any other country in the world. They gave to each family of the first two immigrations, as Promised Land. This was not true with the widely proclaimed privileges, which had set those immigrants apart from the Russian populace as a whole. No one denies the fact that over a hundred years those privileges were never interfered with on the part of the government. Although, for some time a good number of those immigrants and their descendants expected that they would be asked to relinquish one or the other of their long enjoyed privileges. However, they never expected that their government, which was so liberal at the beginning to the immigration, and had more or less granted those privileges as an added inducement to come to would then suddenly and unexpectedly deprive them of all their special privileges. For the greatest majority of the descendants of the pioneers that was too much and they began to look for immigration to the or . At that time the was opened for settlement. And among those thousand who made us of that opportunity were John Kubischta and Mary Semerad Kubischta.

Ever since Peter the Great, had its eyes on . For that Czar implanted into the hearts of the ruling class, the one great desire to reach the Black Sea and through it the Dardanelles, the Mediterranean Sea and the . It was to be for the open door to all European countries, besides Africa and the . The idea of Peter the Great became the one great ambition of his successors, who had their dream partially realized when in 1783 Crimea was incorporated with . In the course of time it became the favorite resort for Russian Society. Many noblemen had in it, their county seats, parks, and gardens, surpassed by none in . The Czars, too, had their county seats there near the southern extremity of the peninsula.

While southern Crimea can be favorably compared with , the northern part is more a continuation of the southern steppes. The land is fertile and adapted to agriculture and horticulture. The land was good and the climate mild, and not only adaptable for raising all the small grains, but also the various kinds of vegetables, fruits and grapes. Grain of various kinds is produced abundantly. Cattle, horses, sheep and camels are raised there and the fruit culture has been highly developed. In 1862, after the Russo-Crimean War, Czar Alexander II invited several thousand families from and to come and settled the northern part of , where he offered each family 30 Dessiatine or 81 acres of free land. His invitation was readily accepted and in a short time there arose many fine colonies as Alexandroffka, Grigorjeffka, Karamin, Miroffka, Bohemka, Michailoffka, Kirej-Tabor, Schotta, Kamrad and others. The paternal grandparents of Philomena and Louie E. Kubischta are Frank and Anna Kubischta, came with their family among the first immigrants to and settled in the colony of Schotta, near Alexandroffka. The twins, Louie and Philomena, parents are John, born in Bohemia, February 10, 1862 and their mother, Mary Semerad, born on January 17, 1867 at Kirej-Tabor, Crimea, where they were married in 1887. Their maternal grandparents, John and Dorothy Sharepa-Semerad were also immigrants who came to about 1863 or 1864. After farming 10 years in their native country, they left the land of the Czars for the . In spite of the fact that Crimea was such as beautiful country, many of the original immigrants and many more of their descendants left Crimea again within some 30 years for the great Northwest of the . After farming some twelve years in Crimea, John Kubischta and his wife, Mary Semerad as well as John’s parents left the land of the Moscovites in the fall of 1899, for the . The following year they filed their homestead some 10 miles southeast of . By thrift and hard work Philomena’s parents increased their landholdings in time to three quarter sections. John Kubischta and Mary Semerad were blessed with ten children: Anton, born February 13, 1888; Anna‎(Frank Praus)‎, December 23, 1891; Mary, ‎(Frank Miller)‎ born February 10, 1894; Joseph F., June 9, 1896; Louie and Philomena ‎(Paul Klein)‎, twins, born January 6, 1900; Catherine ‎(Henry Bosch)‎, born November 24, 1903; Frances ‎(George Heidt)‎, born May 25, 1905; Frank, born November 12, 1907; and James V., born on March 13,1911. After farming and ranching 18 years Mr. and Mrs. John Kubischta retired at . On November 26, 1929, John Kubischta passed away and was laid to rest in ’s Cemetery. His widow followed him in death on July 27, 1937 and was interred beside him.

Philomena Kubischta, born on January 6, 1900, the daughter of John Kubischta and Mary Semerad, entered marriage on May 3, 1922 to Paul Klein in ’s Church, . The marriage ceremony was performed by Father George P. Aberle, and witnesses were Mr. John Klein and Miss Katherine Kubischta. The paternal grandparents of Philomena were Frank and Anna Kubischta, who were born in and emigrated in 1862 with their parents, at the invitation of Czar Alexander II, to and settled in the colonies of Schotta, near Alexandroffka, . Philomena Kubischta’s maternal grandparents were John and Dorothy, Sharepa-Semerud who immigrated to Crimea from about the same time. For sometime after Paul and Philomena’s marriage they farmed with his mother. Thereafter they rented a farm near Zeneth and South Heart, and then they returned to the paternal farm again until part of the land was sold for the . Their union was blessed with seven children: Catherine ‎(John Kilwein)‎, born October 23, 1922; Marian ‎(Mike Berger, born on June 22, 1924; Anton, born January 17, 1926; Frank, born August 25, 1928; Veronica (Jacob Oster)‎, born April 27, 1930; Valentine George, born March 31, 1932; and Joseph, born October 4, 1936. On December 28, 1938, Philomena Kubischta Klein passed away and was laid to rest in ’s Cemetery. The early death of his wife was indeed a hard blow for him and his small children. However he kept his family together and saw to it that they received a good rural and parochial elementary education and the proper Christian training. After farming for four years more on the paternal farm, Paul Klein sold his 560 acres of land in 1942, which he had inherited from his parents and moved with his children to the Hirschville region, where he bought a full section of land some 14 miles northeast of . There Paul Klein farmed and ranched until about 1957, when he turned the farm over to his youngest sons, with whom he remained until his death, on April 28, 1961. Paul was laid to rest beside Philomena Kubischta his wife. Politically Paul and Philomena Klein were Republicans. Religiously they were lifelong members of the ’s Parish.

.

This is updated Klein History; version by Isabell ‎(Klein)‎ dated July 10, 2009. There are nine children from the union of Valentine G. Klein and Rose Mary Frank . All this material was copied from the book, “Pioneers and Their Sons” One Hun


View Notes for ...


Sources
Birth OneWorldTree
Publication: Name: The Generations Network, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA;
Citation Details: Database online.
  Text: Record for Frank Klein
Death OneWorldTree
Publication: Name: The Generations Network, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA;
Citation Details: Database online.
  Text: Record for Frank Klein

View Sources for ...


Media
There are no media objects for this individual.
View Media for ...


Close Relatives
Family with Paul Klein
Husband
Paul Klein ‎(I01492)‎
Birth 23 July 1897 31 35 Dickinson, Stark, North Dakota, USA
Death 28 April 1961 ‎(Age 63)‎ Gladstone, La Moure, North Dakota, USA
2 years

 
Philomena Kubischta ‎(I01510)‎
Birth 6 January 1900 Dickinson, Stark, North Dakota, USA
Death 28 December 1938 ‎(Age 38)‎ Dickinson, Stark, North Dakota, USA

Marriage: 3 March 1922 -- Dickinson, Stark, North Dakota, USA
#1
Daughter
#2
Son
Frank J. Klein ‎(I01477)‎
Birth 25 August 1928 31 28
Death 28 February 2005 ‎(Age 76)‎ Dickinson, Stark, North Dakota, USA
#3
Son
#4
Daughter
#5
Daughter
#6
Son
Valentine G. Klein ‎(I02075)‎
Birth 31 March 1932 34 32 Dickinson, Stark, North Dakota, USA
Death 19 January 1989 ‎(Age 56)‎ Hazen, Mercer, North Dakota, USA
-6 years
#7
Son
Anton Klein ‎(I02076)‎
Birth 17 January 1926 28 26 Dickinson, Stark, North Dakota, USA
Death 23 September 1997 ‎(Age 71)‎ Dickinson, Stark, North Dakota, United States of America